Document Type: Original Research Article

Authors

1 Chemistry Department, Benue State University, Makudi, Benue State – Nigeria

2 Biochemistry Department, School of Health and Medical Science, Benue State University, Makurdi, Benue state - Nigeria

10.22034/pcbr.2020.240534.1111

Abstract

The paper reports comparative assessment of some phytochemicals in four (4) varieties of pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) merr) peels / rinds. These varieties were Native Pineapple (A), Queens Pineapple (B), MD-2 Pineapple (C), and Smooth Cayene pineapple (D). The pineapples were collected, properly washed, and the peels were processed. After that, the peels were pulverized and oven-dried at 50 OC for 48 h. Chefman 500 W Blender was used to blend these dry samples into 0.5 µm sizes. The resulting peels were used for the analyses of alkaloid, tannin, phytate, oxalate, flavonoid, cardiac glycoside, total phenolic, and βeta- carotene using standard reported procedures. The results implied higher levels of flavonoid and total phenol in the varieties C and D than for the varieties A and B. The levels of β-carotene and cardiac glycoside were found to be significantly different (p <0.05) amongst the different peels. However, it was observed that there was no significant difference (p <0.05) in tannin and phytate contents of these rinds. There was also no significant difference in the oxalate contents of varieties A and B; but difference in the oxalate levels of varieties C and D was significant (p <0.05). Like the varieties A and B, the difference in alkaloids content of varieties C and D was not significant (p <0.05). These peels can be blended into our diets because of the presence of these phytochemicals





The paper reports comparative assessment of some phytochemicals in four (4) varieties of pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) merr) peels / rinds. These varieties were Native Pineapple (A), Queens Pineapple (B), MD-2 Pineapple (C), and Smooth Cayene pineapple (D). The pineapples were collected, properly washed, and the peels were processed. After that, the peels were pulverized and oven-dried at 50 OC for 48 h. Chefman 500 W Blender was used to blend these dry samples into 0.5 µm sizes. The resulting peels were used for the analyses of alkaloid, tannin, phytate, oxalate, flavonoid, cardiac glycoside, total phenolic, and βeta- carotene using standard reported procedures. The results implied higher levels of flavonoid and total phenol in the varieties C and D than for the varieties A and B. The levels of β-carotene and cardiac glycoside were found to be significantly different (p <0.05) amongst the different peels. However, it was observed that there was no significant difference (p <0.05) in tannin and phytate contents of these rinds. There was also no significant difference in the oxalate contents of varieties A and B; but difference in the oxalate levels of varieties C and D was significant (p <0.05). Like the varieties A and B, the difference in alkaloids content of varieties C and D was not significant (p <0.05). These peels can be blended into our diets because of the presence of these phytochemicals. 

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References

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